Chamber Works

 
 

Ausencias/AusÊncias/Absences

For string quartet, fixed media, dance and interactive video

  • Introduction
  • I. Violeta
  • II. Alfonsina
  • Interlude
  • III. Ana C.

I believe generating empathy through art can be a strong mechanism to develop our understanding of one another. In this work, I explore the concept of suicide in an attempt to exercise our capacity for empathy and compassion as well as to destigmatize mental illness.

Ausencias/Ausências/Absences, for string quartet, fixed media, dance, and interactive video is a thirty-minute intermedia work that can also be performed in a music-only format. The artistic impetus of this work was taken from the last writings of three South American poets who took their own lives: Chilean Violeta Parra (1917-1967), Argentinean Alfonsina Storni (1892-1938) and Brazilian Ana
Cristina Cesar (1952-1983). The three main movements of the piece each focus on one poet and are inspired by the song Gracias a la vida (1966), by Parra, and the poems Me voy a dormir (1938), by Storni, and Samba canção (1982), by Cesar.

The audio and video portions of the work include images and recordings taken during the research trips to Chile, Brazil and Argentina I made in 2015, including the Cuatro Venezolano (small guitar with four strings) that belonged to Violeta Parra. In the intermedia version of the work, the dance floor is illuminated by images projected from two overhead projectors. The dancers’ movements are captured by a camera suspended above the stage. Touch Designer and Kinect motion tracking technology allows the dancers to trigger video gestures with their movements.

The choreographer Sandra Torijano created the dance, visual artist Kat Johnson and myself produced the visual media for the projections, and Carlos García developed the interactive technology. This full work was premiered on March 24th, 2017 at the Duderstadt Video Studio at the University of Michigan. The original music-only version was premiered by JACK Quartet on March 2016, commissioned by the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard university. This is the version featured in the video above.

Full version with video coming soon!

 

 

 

LUS IN BELLO

for Bb Cl, 2 Vlns, Vla, Vcl

(Version for Bb Cl, Fl, Pno, Vln, Vc available)

Lus in Bello is the Latin for “Law of War;” this is a set of moral principles that regulate confrontation. These implicit and explicit pacts must be honored during the conflict. Inspired by the socio-political confrontations in Venezuela started in February 2014, Lus in Bello is my response to the violent repression the government executed against civilian protesters, repression that costed lives and the continuous violation of human rights. With longing of times of peace and prosperity, the piece engages with dream-like sections in which a color saturated imagery of a perfect future is tinted with crispy dissonances. 

 

Large Ensemble Works

 

Virginia

for Alto and SATB choir

Virginia is based on Virginia Woolf´s suicide letter to her husband, dated in May 1941.

Dearest,

I feel certain I am going mad again. I feel we can’t go through another of those terrible times. And I shan’t recover this time. I begin to hear voices, and I can’t concentrate. So I am doing what seems the best thing to do. You have given me the greatest possible happiness. You have been in every way all that anyone could be. I don’t think two people could have been happier till this terrible disease came. I can’t fight any longer. I know that I am spoiling your life, that without me you could work. And you will I know. You see I can’t even write this properly. I can’t read. What I want to say is I owe all the happiness of my life to you. You have been entirely patient with me and incredibly good. I want to say that – everybody knows it. If anybody could have saved me it would have been you. Everything has gone from me but the certainty of your goodness. I can’t go on spoiling your life any longer.

I don’t think two people could have been happier than we have been.

 

Incertidumbres

For string quartet, string orchestra, piano and percussion

 

Electronic Works

 

Dejate Caer

For violin and electronics

The title Déjate Caer can be translated from spanish as: let yourself fall, and is taken from the poem Arbol de Diana by Alejandra Pizarnik:

“Vida, mi vida, déjate caer, déjate doler,
mi vida, déjate enlazar de fuego,
de silencio ingenuo,
de piedras verdes en la casa de la noche,
déjate caer y doler, mi vida.”

[Life, my life, let yourself fall, let yourself hurt,
my life, let yourself be engulfed by fire,
of ingenuous silence,
of green stones in the house of the night,
let yourself fall and hurt, my life.]

 

Añoranzas

For cello and electronics